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WSLL @ Your Service December 2011

 

What’s New – Connie Von Der Heide

You’re Invited!

The staff of the Wisconsin State Law Library cordially invites you to our annual holiday open house on Tuesday, December 13, from 3:00 to 4:30 in the library Reading Room.  We hope you’ll join us for some light refreshments.

Holiday Closings

WSLL, MLRC and DCLRC will be closed on Monday, December 26 and Monday, January 2 in observance of the Christmas and New Year state holidays.  All three libraries will be open regular hours on Friday, December 23 and Friday, December 30.  We wish you a safe and happy holiday season.

Looking ahead, all three libraries will also be closed on Monday, January 16 in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. state holiday.

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This Just In… – Pete Boll

New! The Future of Evidence: How Science & Technology Will Change The Practice of Law, edited by Carol Henderson and Jules Epstein
American Bar Association, 2011
Call Number: KF 8935 .F88 2011

Lawyers are required to be competent and diligent, and therefore must be aware of emerging areas of science and their evidentiary implications. The editors of this book attempt to identify key areas in the legal and scientific communities where law, science, and technology intersect – and may even collide.  Topics include:

  • Chapter 1, “The Social Construction of the Admissibility of the Most Frequently Proffered Varieties of Expert Testimony” discusses the gatekeeping role and how judges have used a variety of factors to arrive at decisions about the admissibility of expert evidence and testimony.
  • Chapter 4, “The Juror and the Courtroom of the Future” discusses the electronic transformation of the courtroom, both in terms of the increasing use of multimedia presentations of evidence and the courtroom’s online or virtual presence as proceedings are teleconferenced or otherwise conducted in multiple locations.
  • Chapter 5, “The Future of Neuroscientific Evidence” explores both its foreseeable potential and whether “revolutionary” claims about this science have merit in the adjudicative process.

Updated! Judicial Disqualification: Recusal and Disqualification of Judges, by Richard E. Flamm
2nd edition, 2011 supplement
Banks and Jordan Law Publishing, 2007
Call Number: KF 8861 .F58 2007 (2011 Supplement)

Unlike many other areas of law, the subject of judicial disqualification is controlled almost exclusively by statutes, constitutional provisions, and court rules. Consequently, the law of judicial disqualification may vary greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and sometimes even within jurisdictions. As a result, general principles are often extremely hard to come by. Filling that need, this one-volume 2nd edition is divided into the following eleven parts, with updates in the new 744-page cumulative 2011 supplement.

  • Part I provides an overview of the entire field, with a detailed discussion of the various legal and ethical bases for judicial disqualification.
  • Parts II – V focus on the various grounds that have been advanced in support of disqualification motions.
  • Part VI deals with the procedure, timeliness, and legal sufficiency of such motions.
  • Part VII analyzes the different factors that may be evaluated in deciding disqualification motions.
  • Parts VIII and IX focus on the nuances of disqualification law that are unique to federal and state proceedings.
  • Part X treats disqualification in special types of proceedings such as appellate, contempt, and criminal proceedings.
  • Part XI deals with issues involved in the appeal of judicial disqualification motions.

New Titles RSS Feed
See our latest New Titles list for a list of new books and other resources.

For assistance in accessing these or other resources, please contact our Reference Desk.

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1836–2011: Celebrating Our History – Amy Crowder

Reflecting on Our Anniversary Year

Over the Wisconsin State Law Library’s 175 years, we have been committed to serving the legal information needs of the citizens of this state.  Today, we continue to provide the highest quality of professional expertise in the selection, maintenance and use of materials, information and technology in order to facilitate equal access to the law.  

Throughout 2011 we've celebrated the accomplishments of the Wisconsin State Law Library with a variety of events, awards and articles. It’s gone by so quickly, and we thank you for joining us in celebrating this momentous year. 

In the words of our state’s motto, the library is looking “Forward” to many anniversaries to come. 

library door celebration books
books catalog

Celebrating 175 years of service

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Tech Tip in Brief – Heidi Yelk

CleanPrint – control how much you print from webpages

CleanPrintIf you’ve recently printed content from the websites of CNN, ABC News, or the Washington Post, you may have noticed they utilize a “CleanPrint” option.  This handy tool can be used to customize printing, allowing you to eliminate images, change the font size and even use less toner (an option available on CNN.com).

When a “partner” website is using CleanPrint to process print requests, users who click a print button next to a story will see this symbol appear on the screen:

The content is then formatted into the CleanPrint dialog box where the user can determine output.  Standard features include removing images, adding a note, and even removing blocks of text from the story. (Another reminder for researchers to be skeptical of web content, even when it appears to come from a trusted source.) The usual “sharing” features – Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn – are also available.   

Perhaps the best news about CleanPrint is that you don’t have to be on a “partner” website to use it.  The maker, FormatDynamics, has made it available as a “bookmarklet” allowing users to “CleanPrint” from any website.  To add this tool on IE8+, Firefox 3.5+, Chrome 2+,or  Safari 4+ see these instructions.

For convenience, put the CleanPrint bookmarklet within easy reach - for example, in your Internet Explorer Favorites bar or Firefox Bookmarks Toolbar. When a webpage is displayed in your browser, simply click the bookmark or favorite and CleanPrint will engage.

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WSLL Recommends: National Business Institute Books

National Business Institute booksThis monthly column highlights a legal research tool, in print and/or electronic format, that is not freely available on the internet. We hope it will increase your knowledge of sources with which you might already be familiar and help to expand your legal research toolkit.

Many legal practitioners recognize the name National Business Institute (NBI), a leading provider of legal and professional education not only in Wisconsin but throughout the U.S. Founded in 1983 and based in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, NBI has served over 2 million professionals through training seminars presented in live, audio, teleconference, webcast, and online on-demand formats.

Each NBI legal training program is developed and taught by practicing professionals and includes course materials prepared by those same professionals. NBI provides them as downloadable PDFs, CD-ROMs, or printed publications. Sometimes the material consists of only an annotated outline, but often it's a complete narrative accompanied by excerpts from applicable statutes and court opinions. The addition of sample forms, letters and checklists gives the reader useful, practical knowledge in a particular type of case or area of the law.

NBI materials have been part of the WSLL collection for many years. Since 2006 we've purchased 20 to 25 new NBI titles every year through a standing order arrangement with the publisher. A search of the online catalog retrieves nearly 200 NBI titles, all of which may be borrowed by WSLL cardholders.

To illustrate the variety of coverage and practical focus of NBI publications, here are some of the titles WSLL has purchased so far this year:

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Odds 'n' Endings – Carol Hassler

We have mined some of our past Odds ‘n’ Endings articles, as well as current news and events to give you a puzzle for this month’s column. We’ll post the answers during the week of December 12th on Library Highlights

Download a printable version

Odds 'n' Endings crossword puzzle

Across

1. Dec. 15th – Bill of ______ Day. Visit our Constitutions page for links to the full text of the Bill and commentary.
3. Dec. 22nd – Winter ______ marks the beginning of winter.
5. Dec. 13th – WSLL Annual Winter Open _______.
7. Dec. 7th – In 1787, Delaware became the first state to ______ the Constitution of the United States. Read more about it on this State of Delaware history webpage.
9. Dec. 28th – The ________ Species Act passed in 1973. Learn more at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
11. Dec. 4, 1945. The United States Senate approves full participation in the United ______.
12. Dec. 10th – The originator of this famous prize died in 1896. The prizes honored achievements in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature and Peace. Learn more at the Prize website.
13. Dec. 19, 1776. “These are the times that try men’s souls…” Thomas Paine publishes the ________ Crisis.
14. Wisconsin had a total of ______ capital locations. Learn about Wisconsin’s capital and capitol history in this 1983/84 WI Blue Book article.
15. Benjamin Franklin published Poor Richard’s _________ on Dec. 19, 1732.
17. In 1800, Washington D.C. was established as the U.S. ________

Down

2. Google’s Street View ______ captured these winter ski images.
4. Dec. 10th – The United Nations Universal _______ of Human Rights was adopted in 1948
6. The WI Dept. of Transportation hosts a "law of the month". The November article features tips on winter _______.
8. The treaty establishing the _______ Purchase officially transferred control of the land on Dec. 3, 1803.
10. Effective Dec. 2nd, the amount of _______ on a judgment is changed with 2011 Act 69
16. The Thirteenth Amendment, which ________ slavery, was ratified on Dec. 6, 1865.
17. Dec. 26 and Jan 2: Libraries _______ for the holidays.

Created by Puzzlemaker at DiscoveryEducation.com

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Last Updated: October 17, 2012 | Up to Top
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